Week Two: How to Write Essays Like a Star

Week Two–August 22-24

Class 3 is August 22
Class 4 is August 24

You have received your first big writing assignment.

Paper One Assignment:

  • Assignment Paper 1: Keeping in mind that ritualistic or routine behavior is a type of cycle, discuss the cyclical behavior in Frost’s two poems “Birches” and “Mending Wall.” In essay form, also respond to this question, “If fences make good neighbors, what is the purpose of a gate?” You need to refer to Sandburg’s poem “Fences” for this part of your response.

For the next two classes, we’ll discuss what I expect from you regarding your writing of Paper 1. It is very important that you study the following videos that take you through the process of writing a college paper, step by step. 

How to Write An Essay Overview:

There Are 3 Main Stages to Writing An Essay

  1. Preparation
  2. Writing
  3. Revision

Stages of Preparation

  1. Understand the Assignment
  2. Choose A Topic
  3. Write A Thesis Statement – This is the main point you want to make in your essay.
  4. Create An Outline

Understand the Assignment:

  • Assignment Paper 1: Keeping in mind that ritualistic or routine behavior is a type of cycle, discuss the cyclical behavior in Frost’s two poems “Birches” and “Mending Wall.” In essay form, also respond to this question, “If fences make good neighbors, what is the purpose of a gate?” You need to refer to Sandburg’s poem “Fences” for this part of your response.

I have given you a broad framework around which you will focus your response for Paper 1. You might approach this assignment in several ways.

  1. Step 1 is to narrow the broad assignment and decide exactly what you want to address in your paper.
  2. Step 2 is to write a thesis statement that clearly establishes what position you will develop in your paper.
  3. Step 3 is to write an outline for your paper.

  1. Read “The Literary Research Paper” in  Meyer & Miller, pages 1537-1553.
  2. Your Homework Assignment to complete before the next class meeting is to write a thesis statement and to create an outline for your paper.  This is due before the next class meeting.

How to Write A Thesis Statement

How to Create an Outline for Your Essay

How to Write a Strong Introduction for Your Essay

How to Write Strong Paragraphs

How to Write A Topic Sentence

Conclusion

The following should be completed by Monday, August 29.

Read Meyer & Miller, pgs. 1545 – 1551 Documenting Sources and Avoiding Plagiarism

The Following Info is from Grammarly Here

We use quotation marks with direct quotes, with titles of certain works, to imply alternate meanings, and to write words as words.
Block quotations are not set off with quotation marks.
The quoted text is capitalized if you’re quoting a complete sentence and not capitalized if you’re quoting a fragment.

Quotation marks are for when you want to use someone else’s words in your writing. Let’s say you want to write about something you heard your friend say. You could do it like this:

John said, “I really hate when it’s hot outside.”
You can write about the same thing without using the quotation marks, with a couple of changes:

John said he hated when it was hot outside.

The first sentence contains a direct quote, a quote in which you report the exact words John used. The second sentence contains an indirect quote, which is a paraphrased version of what John said. Quotation marks are used only with direct quotes.

This rule isn’t just for speech. If you’re quoting a written source, you should still put the quote between quotation marks unless you plan to paraphrase it.

Let’s Look at How We Might Use Quotation Marks in the Three Little Pigs:

The following is an indirect quote. These are not the exact words of the pig It is a mere report of the fact that the pig had said something that went something like this:

Once upon a time there was an old Sow with three little Pigs, and since she had not enough to keep them, one of the little pigs said that the three of them would leave home and try to make it on their own.

The above is an example of paraphrasing:

If I wanted to report that little pig’s exact words, I might say the following:

The first little pig said, “We will go out into the world and try to make it on our own.”

Man with a bundle of straw

The first that went off met a Man with a bundle of straw, and said to him, “Please, Man, give me that straw to build me a house”; which the Man did, and the little Pig built a house with it.

Then I'll huff and I'll puff

Presently came along a Wolf, and knocked at the door, and said, “Little Pig, little Pig, let me come in.”

To which the Pig answered, “Not by the hair of my chinny chin chin.”

“Then I’ll huff and I’ll puff, and I’ll blow your house in!” said the Wolf. So he huffed and he puffed, and he blew his house in, and he ate up the little Pig.

 

To be perfectly honest, it has always been difficult for me to create an outline before I do some writing. If you need to free write about where you want to go with your paper before you outline it that is ok.